Workshops series 2 – PUBLICS

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Workshops series 2

Publics

Bishopsgate Institute / KCL 18-19 May 2018

 

Friday 18th May: Bishopsgate Institute

12.30               Delegates assemble

13.00               Introducing the Network & Introducing the Day (ED, RH, MH)

13.30 – 15.30   Archive workshop with Michelle Johansen, Bishopsgate Institute (1)

15.30               Break

16.00-17.00     Archive reflections

17.00               Session ends: delegates assemble for pub/dinner

 

Saturday 19th May: Kings College, London

09.30               Delegates assemble

 

10.00 – 11.00   Session 1 — Framing

Christine Grandy (Lincoln)

Cultural History’s Absent Audience: Inventing the Public between the Wars

 

11.00 – 12.30   Session 2 — Looking

Diane Ranyard (Lincoln)

‘This part-day sitting has been termed the “matinee”’: Publicity, and the shaming ritual of the Divorce Court

Vanessa Van den Berghe (Kingston)

Space and Image: Consider the Role of the Public in the Consumption of the Interior during the 1920s and 1930s

Heidi Eggington (Cambridge)

Collecting for the Nation:  Art Funding and the Gallery-Visiting Public in Interwar Britain

 

12.30 – 13.30   Lunch

 

13.30 – 15.00   Session 3 — Listening

Michael Guida (Sussex)

Listening Publics after the Great War

Richard Hornsey (Nottingham)

We are the Ovaltineys: Children’s Counter-Publics in 1930s Britain

Michael McCluskey (York)

Public Projects: GPO ‘Phone Films

 

15.00 -1515     Break

 

15.15 -16.45    Session 4 — Being

Sarah Mass (Michigan)

J.B. Priestley and the “Public Good” in 1930s Britain

Elizabeth Darling (Oxford Brookes)

What Does a Public Corporation Look Like? The Problem of BBC Broadcasting House

Emma West (Birmingham)

‘To be Shared by All:’ Democracy and Decentralisation at the Arts League of Service, 1919-37

 

17.00 – 18.00   Summing up

 

18.00+             Delegates disperse…or dinner

 

 

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CFP

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CALL FOR PAPERS

20s30sNetwork

*** PUBLICS ***

 

A two-day workshop at the Bishopsgate Institute and Kings College London  (TBC)

Friday 18 (p.m.) and Saturday 19 May 2018

 

The 20s30sNetwork brings together scholars from across disciplines who share an interest in British society, culture and politics in the 1920s and 1930s. By creating a conversation between people working in history, literary studies, cultural studies, geography, and the histories of art, architecture, media, design, and film, we aim to explore new ways of thinking about the historical significance of these two decades.

We now invite proposals for 20-minute contributions to a two-day workshop exploring the theme of ‘publics’. We will begin with an afternoon session at the Bishopsgate Institute exploring its rich archive on radical politics and popular culture in London in the 1920s and 1930s [http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/Library/Special-Collections-and-Archives]. We will then continue with a full day of conference papers and discussion at Kings College, London.

What happens when we use ‘publics’ to continue a cross-disciplinary conversation about the nature of British society, culture, politics, and economy in the 1920s and 1930s? This is an exploratory event, so we don’t wish to prescribe interpretations of the theme. But you might wish to focus on the publics of social policy, of political participation, of new forms of broadcasting, or of mass consumption. What was it to feel part of a public in this period (or to feel excluded from one)? What were the normative conditions of becoming a member of a public? On what scales were publics constituted, from the metropolitan to the global, and from the contemporary to the historic? You might wish to consider the meanings of publicity in this period, or how it was managed and maintained. You might also wish to explore relationship of the public to the private, or what it was to oppose a public or to forge a counterpublic. We welcome both speculative, exploratory papers and polished pieces of almost-completed research.

Whilst we anticipate that scholars will come from different historical disciplines, we are keen to select papers that will engage the interests of all participants. Please note that due to nature of the archival workshop, there is a maximum capacity of 25 for this event.

Proposals of up to 250 words should be sent to 20s30snetwork@gmail.com by Friday 16 February 2018.

 

About the network

The 20s30sNetwork was founded in 2011 and rooted in a shared interest in British society, culture and politics in the 1920s and 1930s. It seeks to bring together scholars from across disciplines to develop new ways of thinking about the historical significance of these two decades. Previous workshops have explored ‘Networks and Associations,’ ‘Authenticity and Trust,’ and ‘Display.’ The 20s30sNetwork is convened by Elizabeth Darling (Oxford Brookes), Richard Hornsey (Nottingham), and Matt Houlbrook (Birmingham).

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Workshop

1603-125-years-when-modernism-was-young-04-copy

 

20s30sNetwork: Workshop on “Display”:

Boots/University of Nottingham, 5-6 May 2017

DRAFT PROGRAMME

The 20s30sNetwork brings together scholars from across disciplines around our shared interests in British society, culture, and politics in the 1920s and 1930s. By creating a conversation between people working in history, literary studies, cultural studies, geography, and the histories of art, architecture, media, design, and film, our aim is to explore new ways of thinking about the historical significance of these two decades.

We’re now inviting registrations for this forthcoming workshop. Spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis. Due to the nature of the workshop, we’re keen to prioritise people who are working on Britain in the 1920s and 30s. It would be helpful if you could include a brief statement of your research interests when applying for a place to 20s30sNetwork@gmail.com.

 

Friday 5th May:

D10 ‘Wets’ factory, Boots site, Beeston, Nottingham

12.15: Delegates assemble outside D10

12.30: Introductions (ED, RH, MH, SC)

13.00: Tour of D10, and peruse of related material

14.00: Boots film screening: ‘How Others See Us’ and ‘See How They Won’ + general discussion

 

15.00: Tea break

 

15.15: ‘Boots and Britishness’

– Hilary Ingram, University of Nottingham (w. Anna Greenwood?) + general discussion

15:45: Archive session (w. Merch. Bulletins, Bees, and Beacons)

– Richard Hornsey, University of Nottingham, and Sophie Clapp, Boots Company Archive

 

17.00: Session ends: delegates assemble for pub/dinner
Friday 6th May:

Trent Building, University of Nottingham, University Park

09.00: Delegates assemble

 

09.30-11.00: Panel 1: Displays of Sex and Privacy

Claire Jones, University of Kent: ‘Over the Counter and on the High Street: The Promotional Display of Contraceptives in 1920s and 1930s Britain’

Hilary Hinds, Lancaster University: ‘Twin Beds on Display’

Mara Arts, Birkbeck, UoL: ‘How did British Films of the 1920s and 1930s display London’s Night-time Pleasure Economy?’

+ general discussion

 

11.00-11.15: Coffee Break

 

11.15-12.45: Panel 2: Displays of Empire and Race

Neal Shasore, University of Westminster: ‘Lawrence Weaver and the Imperial Arts of Display: Architecture and Publicity at the British Empire Exhibition, Wembley’

Stephen Legg, University of Nottingham: ‘Making India in London: Displaying the International at the Round Table Conference, 1930-32’

Christine Grandy, University of Lincoln: ‘Black-face in Britain: Racial Play and Display in inter-war Screen Culture’

+ general discussion

 

12.45: Lunch Break

 

13.45-15.15: Panel 3: Displaying the Forces of Modernity

James Taylor, Lancaster University: ‘A Complete Display of Every Department of Advertising: The Advertising Industry and Exhibitions in inter-war London’

Steffan Blayney, Birkbeck, UoL: ‘Displaying the Productive Body: Exhibiting and Envisioning the Worker in inter-war Britain’

John Wyver, University of Westminster: ‘BBC Television and the Display of Modernity’

+ general discussion

 

15.15: Tea Break

 

15.30-17.00: Panel 4: Commercial Displays

Cath Feely, University of Derby: ‘The Warm Glow of the Paper Shop Window: Newsagents on Display in the 1920s and 1930s

Zoe Thomas, University of Birmingham: ‘Arts and Crafts on Display: Women and “Artistic” Shop-keeping in inter-war London’

Vicky Jackson, University of Bristol: ‘Animation, Display and Consumer Culture’

+ general discussion

 

17.00: Sum-up and reflections

 

17.30: Session ends: delegates disperse or go to the pub

 

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CFP

1603-125-years-when-modernism-was-young-04-copy

CALL FOR PAPERS

20s30sNetwork

*** DISPLAY ***

A two-day workshop at the University of Nottingham

Friday 5 (p.m.) and Saturday 6 May 2017

The 20s30sNetwork brings together scholars from across disciplines around our shared interests in British society, culture, and politics in the 1920s and 1930s. By creating a conversation between people working in history, literary studies, cultural studies, geography, and the histories of art, architecture, media, design, and film, our aim is to explore new ways of thinking about the historical significance of these two decades.

We now invite proposals for 20-minute papers for a two-day workshop at the University of Nottingham that will explore the theme of ‘display’. The first session, on Friday afternoon, will be at the Boots site in nearby Beeston, and will include a tour of the D10 Wets factory and a workshop on material from the Boots Company Archive. This will be followed by a full day of papers and discussion on Saturday at the University.

What happens when we use the notion of display as the focus for a cross-disciplinary conversation about the nature of British society, culture, politics, and economy in the 1920s and 1930s? This is an exploratory conversation, so we don’t wish to be prescriptive about interpretations of the theme. But you may wish to focus upon public or private events in which display was an integral part, e.g. a coronation, jubilee, birthday party, wedding, etc. ‘Display’ might also raise questions for you around advertising and packaging, self-presentation and fashion, the display of emotions, media events, pageantry, political demonstrations, or performance. 

We anticipate that scholars and papers will be rooted in different historical disciplines, but we are keen to solicit papers that gesture beyond these fields to engage the wider interests of other workshop participants. Please note that there is limited capacity for this event.

Proposals of 250 words should be sent to 20s30sNetwork@gmail.com by Friday 6 January 2017.logo-pack_web-06The 20s30sNetwork was founded in 2011 and its rooted in our shared interest in British society, culture and politics in the 1920s and 1930s. It seeks to bring together scholars from across disciplines to develop new ways of thinking about the historical significance of these two decades. Previous workshops have been on such themes as ‘Networks and Associations’ and ‘Authenticity and Trust’. The 20s30sNetwork is convened by Elizabeth Darling (Oxford Brookes), Richard Hornsey (Nottingham), and Matt Houlbrook (Birmingham).

 

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